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HOW TO USE THE NORTH BY NUMBERS TOOL:

Selecting a Layer to View:

To view Census/NHS data, use the drop-down lists on left hand side of the page to drill down to a specific data layer. First select a Topic, then a Variable, then a Year, and finally your Geography of interest (to view a layer you must make a selection for each of these four lists). In a moment, your layer should overlay on the map. Also, the legend for that particular layer should appear at the top right of the screen. See screenshot below:

Map view

Navigation and Map Options:

There are three options for navigating to a particular area of interest: 1) zoom using your mouse wheel; 2) use the + and boxes within the map viewer; or 3) you can use the Zoom Tools on the left side of the screen to Zoom to a Municipality or Zoom to a Reserve of choice.

Navigation

You may also adjust the Opacity of the layer to view the map base underneath your location of interest. This will allow you to see the roads, rivers, parks, place names, etc. The Opacity slider bar is located at the bottom-centre of the map viewer and is set to 75% opacity as a default. To change the opacity, slide the bar left to increase transparency or right to increase opacity. The screenshot below shows the slider bar at the 45% opacity position:

Opacity

By clicking on a particular location in the map, you will see an attribute pop-up box with information about that location including the name, geographic code(s) and data specific to the layer. The geography in its entirety (including islands) will be highlighted in cyan. This can be repeated for other geographies.

Attributes

Please note that some locations may not contain data for various reasons. These areas will appear as light grey in the map and will contain the value of “-9999” within the attribute pop-up box. See the example for Rankin Location 15D below:

No Data

Downloading Tabular Data:

When viewing a layer, you may download the corresponding tabular data for the entire layer in comma separated values (CSV) file format. To download the CSV file click the “Excel” button. A pop-up box will ask you whether you would like to Save the file or Open it. It can be opened with any program that allows you to view CSV files, including MS Excel, Open Office Calc, Notepad, etc.

Download CSV

Each CSV file contains tabular data for the selected data variable. CSV files also contain reference columns to indicate the geographic code, geographic type, and name for each record.

Tabular data files at the Census Division (CD) level contain reference columns for the Census Division unique identification code (CD UID), the name of the Census Division (CD NAME) and the type of the Census Division (CD TYPE). For a full list of Census Division Types, please see the List of Acronyms section of this help page.

Tabular data files at the Census Subdivision (CSD) level contain reference columns for the Census Subdivision unique identification code (CSD UID), the name of the Census Subdivision (CSD NAME) and the type of the Census Subdivision (CSD TYPE). For a list of Census Subdivision Types, please see the List of Acronyms section of this help page. Because each Census Subdivisions resides within a Census Division, all records also include the corresponding Census Division unique identification code (CD UID), the name of the Census Division (CD NAME) and the type of the Census Division (CD TYPE).

Tabular data files at the Dissemination Area (DA) level contain a reference column for the Dissemination Area unique identification code (DA UID). Dissemination Areas do not have names or types. Because each Dissemination Area resides within a Census Subdivision, all records also include the corresponding Census Subdivision unique identification code (CSD UID), the name of the Census Subdivision (CSD NAME) and the type of the Census Subdivision (CSD TYPE). They also include the corresponding Census Division unique identification code (CD UID), the name of the Census Division (CD NAME) and the type of the Census Division (CD TYPE).

Downloading KMZ file:

You may also download the actual layer itself in KMZ format. To do so, click the Google Earth button. A pop-up box will ask you whether you would like to Save the file or Open it.

Download KMZ

This file can be viewed in Google Earth a freely downloadable geo-viewer https://www.google.com/earth/. The benefit of viewing a layer in Google Earth is that other location data can be turned on or off by the user.

Google Earth

Printing:

You may print a map view by selecting the Print button. The print button should bring up the Print dialog box. Your print out will contain your map view as well as the legend and data sources.

For optimal printing results we recommend using Google Chrome. Also, please ensure that your printer's page orientation is set to 'Landscape'

CLASSIFICATION METHODOLOGY

All data layers for the variables in the Northern Ontario Census / NHS Catalog are displayed using a sequential colour scheme; 5 colours ranging from yellow (low) to dark orange (high). For the vast majority of data layers, the divisions between classes were determined using a quintile method. Quintiles separate the data into 5 equal sized classes (or 20th percentiles). For example, if there are 500 geographies in a layer, the top 100 (the top 20th percentile) will fall in the “high” class, the lowest 100 will fall into the “low” class (the bottom 20th percentile) and so on. The quintile approach was chosen for the majority of layers for two main reasons:

  1. The histograms of most of the data variables show fairly even distributions of data. The quintile approach is suitable for data with these types of histograms; and
  2. The quintile classification reduces the visual impact that extreme outliers have on the map. Extreme outliers exist in the data due to Statistics Canada’s policy of random rounding and from incompletely enumerated areas.
Exception: The Aboriginal Identity variables use a natural breaks classification method rather than the quintile method described above. This is because the histograms for these variables show a mix of geographies with very low and very high totals/percentages of Aboriginal Identity persons. It was determined that these variables would not be well represented by the quintile classification method.

LIST OF ACRONYMS

Geographies

CD Census Division
CD UID Census Division Unique Identification Code
CSD Census Subdivision
CSD UID Census Subdivision Unique Identification Code
DA Dissemination Area
DA UID Dissemination Area Unique Identification Code

Types of Census Divisions/Census Subdivisions (and Year):

CDR Census Division (2006, 2011)
C City (2001, 2006, 2011)
CV City / Ville (2011)
CY City (2006, 2011)
DIS District (2001, 2006, 2011)
DIV Census Division (2001)
IRI Indian Reserve (2006, 2011)
M Municipality (2006, 2011)
MU Municipality (2006, 2011)
NO Unorganized (2006, 2011)
R Indian Reserve (2001)
S-É Indian Settlement (2001, 2006, 2011)
T Town (2001, 2006, 2011)
TP Township (2001, 2006, 2011)
TV Town / Ville (2006, 2011)
UNO Unorganized (2001)
VL Village (2001, 2006, 2011)

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

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Geographies

Census Division (CD)

Group of neighbouring municipalities joined together for the purposes of regional planning and managing common services (such as police or ambulance services). These groupings are established under laws in effect in certain provinces of Canada. For example, a census division might correspond to a county, district, etc. Census divisions are intermediate geographic areas between the province/territory level and the municipality (census subdivision).
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/ref/dict/geo008-eng.cfm

Census Subdivision (CSD)

Area that is a municipality or an area that is deemed to be equivalent to a municipality for statistical reporting purposes (e.g., as an Indian reserve or an unorganized territory). Municipal status is defined by laws in effect in each province and territory in Canada.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/ref/dict/geo012-eng.cfm

Dissemination Area (DA)

A small, relatively stable geographic unit composed of one or more adjacent dissemination blocks. It is the smallest standard geographic area for which all census data are disseminated. DAs cover all the territory of Canada.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/ref/dict/geo012-eng.cfm.

Data Sources

Census of Canada

The census is Canada's largest and most comprehensive data source. The Census of Population collects demographic and linguistic information on every man, woman and child living in Canada. The Census of Agriculture, conducted the same month, collects information on Canada's agricultural operations. The census is the main source of data available in a standardized format for small areas. It provides nationally comparable data that can be cross-classified to show details. It is also the main body of comprehensive statistical data at the sub-provincial level on Canada's population.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/ref/overview-apercu/pop1-eng.cfm

National Household Survey (NHS)

Between May and August 2011, Statistics Canada conducted the NHS for the first time. This voluntary, self-administered survey was introduced as a replacement for the long census questionnaire, more widely known as Census Form 2B. The NHS is designed to collect social and economic data about the Canadian population. The objective of the NHS is to provide data for small geographic areas and small population groups. Roughly 4.5 million households across Canada were selected for the NHS, representing about one-third of all households.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/nhs-enm_guide/index-eng.cfm

Data Variables

Aboriginal Identity

Aboriginal Identity

'Aboriginal identity' refers to whether the person reported being an Aboriginal person, that is, First Nations (North American Indian), Métis or Inuk (Inuit) and/or being a Registered or Treaty Indian (that is, registered under the Indian Act of Canada) and/or being a member of a First Nation or Indian band. Aboriginal peoples of Canada are defined in the Constitution Act, 1982, section 35 (2) as including the Indian, Inuit and Métis peoples of Canada.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/pop001-eng.cfm

Dwelling Characteristics

Occupied Dwelling

Refers to a separate set of living quarters with a private entrance either from outside or from a common hall, lobby, vestibule or stairway inside the building in which a person or a group of persons is permanently residing. The entrance to the dwelling must be one that can be used without passing through the living quarters of someone else.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/dwelling-logements006-eng.cfm

Owner Occupied Dwelling

A household is considered to own their dwelling if some member of the household owns the dwelling even if it is not fully paid for, for example if there is a mortgage or some other claim on it.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/households-menage024-eng.cfm

Renter Occupied Dwelling

A household is considered to rent their dwelling if no member of the household owns the dwelling. A household is considered to rent that dwelling even if the dwelling is provided without cash rent or at a reduced rent, or if the dwelling is part of a cooperative.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/households-menage024-eng.cfm

Band Housing

On-reserve housing that is built, managed, and owned by the band.
Source: http://www.aref.ab.ca/resourcelibrary/documents/case_study_ENGLISH.pdf

Education

Certificate, Diploma, or Degree

Information indicating the person's most advanced certificate, diploma or degree. This is a derived variable obtained from the educational qualifications questions, which asked for all certificates, diplomas and degrees to be reported. The general hierarchy used in deriving this variable (high school graduation, trades, college, university) is loosely tied to the 'in-class' duration of the various types of education. At the detailed level, someone who has completed one type of certificate, diploma or degree will not necessarily have completed the credentials listed below it in the hierarchy. For example, a registered apprenticeship graduate may not have completed a high school certificate or diploma, nor does an individual with a master's degree necessarily have a 'certificate or diploma above the bachelor's level.' Although the hierarchy may not fit all programs perfectly, it gives a general measure of educational attainment.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/pop038-eng.cfm

High School Diploma or Equivalent

Includes persons who have completed the requirements for graduation from a secondary school or the equivalent, but no postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. Examples of secondary (high) school equivalency certificates are General Educational Development (GED) and Adult Basic Education (ABE).
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/pop038-eng.cfm

Apprenticeship or Trades Certificate or Diploma

The 'Registered Apprenticeship certificate' category includes Journeyperson's designation. A journeyman's or journeyperson's certificate in the trades is obtained through successful completion of the examinations for a Certificate of Qualification (COQ). Candidates for the exam must have several years of work experience in the trade or have received their registered apprenticeship certificate through a combination of on-the-job training and in-school training. Other trades certificates or diplomas such as pre-employment or vocational certificates and diplomas are brief trade programs completed at community colleges, institutes of technology, vocational centres, and similar institutions.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/pop038-eng.cfm

College, CEGEP and Other Non-University Certificate or Diploma

Obtained from: a community college; a CEGEP (both general and technical); an institute of technology; a school of nursing; a private business school; a private or public trade school; or a vocational school. Included in this category are teaching and nursing certificates awarded by provincial departments of education, with the exception of teachers' or nurses qualifications obtained at university-affiliated faculties of education or nursing. College certificates or diplomas of two years or more usually have a minimum entrance requirement of a secondary (high) school diploma or its equivalent.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/pop038-eng.cfm

University Certificates or Diploma (Below or Above Bachelor Level)

Awarded for non-degree programs of study completed through a university. They are often connected with professional associations in fields such as accounting, banking, insurance or public administration. If the university certificate or diploma program does not require a bachelor degree to enrol, then it is classified as below the bachelor level. If a university certificate or diploma program normally requires a bachelor's degree as a prerequisite, then it is classified as above the bachelor level.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/pop038-eng.cfm

University Degree

Obtained through universities and other degree-granting institutions.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/pop038-eng.cfm

Labour Force

Labour Force

Refers to persons who, during the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2011, were either employed or unemployed. Labour force = Employed + Unemployed
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/pop056-eng.cfm

Participation Rate

Refers to the labour force in the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2011, expressed as a percentage of the population aged 15 years and over. The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the total population in that group.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/pop108-eng.cfm

Employment Rate

Refers to the number of persons employed in the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2011, expressed as a percentage of the total population aged 15 years and over. The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number of employed persons in that group, expressed as a percentage of the total population in that group.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/pop029-eng.cfm

Unemployment Rate

Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2011. The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/pop125-eng.cfm

Unemployed

Refers to persons who, during the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2011, were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/pop124-eng.cfm

Not in the Labour Force

Refers to persons who, during the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2011, were neither employed nor unemployed.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/pop101-eng.cfm

Income

Total Income

Total of income from all sources, including employment income, income from government programs, pension income, investment income and any other money income.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/guides/99-014-x/99-014-x2011006-eng.cfm

After-Tax Income

Refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2010.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/guides/99-014-x/99-014-x2011006-eng.cfm

Household Income

The total income of a household is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that household.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/guides/99-014-x/99-014-x2011006-eng.cfm

After-Tax Income of Households

The after-tax income of a household is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that household.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/guides/99-014-x/99-014-x2011006-eng.cfm

Median Household Income

The median income of a specified group of households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/guides/99-014-x/99-014-x2011006-eng.cfm

Average Household Income

Average income of households refers to the weighted mean total income of households in 2010. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of households (for example, two person households) by the number of households in that specific group, whether or not they reported income. The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of households.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/guides/99-014-x/99-014-x2011006-eng.cfm

Without Income

Persons aged 15+ who did not report employment income.

Mobility

Mobility (1 Year)

Mobility status, one year refers to the status of a person with regard to the place of residence on the reference day (Census day) in relation to the place of residence on the same date one year earlier.
Source: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/concepts/definitions/mobilit1-eng.html

Movers

Persons who have moved from one residence to another are referred to as movers and persons who have not moved are referred to as non-movers. Movers include non-migrants and migrants.

Non-Migrants

Non-migrants are persons who did move but remained in the same city, town, township, village or Indian reserve.

Migrants

Migrants include internal migrants who moved to a different city, town, township, village or Indian reserve within Canada. Migrants include “external migrants”, who are persons who lived outside Canada at the earlier reference date.

Intraprovincial Migrants

Movers who, on Census Day, were living in a different census subdivision than the one at which they resided one year earlier, in the same province.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/pop075-eng.cfm

Interprovincial Migrants

Movers who, on Census Day, were living in a different census subdivision than the one at which they resided one year earlier, in a different province.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/pop075-eng.cfm

External Migrants

Movers who were living in Canada on Census Day, but who were living outside Canada one year earlier.
Source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/ref/dict/pop075-eng.cfm

Population and Age

Population Growth

Variation, either positive or negative, in a population size over a given period of time, usually one year. Population growth can also be calculated by summing natural and migratory increases.
Source: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-209-x/2014001/gloss-eng.htm#i1

Median Age

Age “x” that divides a population in two groups of the same population size, one group being older than age “x” and the other group being younger than age “x”.
Source: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-209-x/2014001/gloss-eng.htm#i1